About


The world is currently facing the largest humanitarian crisis since the end of the Second World War, with more than 20 million people facing starvation and famine. At the same time, our ability to learn about such crises is severely limited by the failure of the journalism business model. News organisations around the world are struggling to survive and often unable to provide in-depth public interest reporting.

This research project analyses humanitarian journalism at this important juncture. It draws on more than 150 interviews with humanitarian journalists, newsroom observations, extensive analysis of news content, and surveys of audiences. Using this data, we aim to paint a picture of the daily lives of humanitarian journalists and the political, economic and cultural forces that shape their work.

You can find further information about this project -including our latest research publications and blogs – on this site. Please get in touch if you have any questions.

Dr Martin Scott
Martin.Scott@uea.ac.uk
@martinscott2010

Dr Melanie Bunce
melanie.bunce.1@city.ac.uk
@meljbunce

Dr Kate Wright
Kate.Wright@ed.ac.uk
@newsprof1

This research has been approved by the ethics committee at City University.

 

 

PARTNERS

 

 

 

IMAGE CREDITS

 

Twitter

It’s 12 months since @tandfonline published my article https://t.co/eM17stjgeJ

Could this have a butterfly effect on celebrity charity endorsements? Fantastic work by the likes of @nowhitesaviors @BrandAid_World @martinscott2010 @danbrockington who have played a significant role in shedding light on this issue over the years https://t.co/ZtOUZquIyo

A photo opportunity with the Principal of ⁦@EdinburghUni⁩ Professor Peter Mathieson and Vice Principal International, Professor James Smith at the #AfricaPastPresentFuture event at the #McEwanHall