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The Humanitarian Journalism project is seeking to better understand how the news media report on humanitarian crises and what shapes their coverage.

We are seeking to map the sub-field of humanitarian journalism and in doing so, further investigate:

1)     How journalists define humanitarian news

2)     How such news is shaped by political, economic and technological factors

3)     What the impact of humanitarian news is on the humanitarian sector

This project is an interdisciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration that draws on newsroom ethnography, interviews and content analysis. Please get in touch if you have any questions about our work. Further details about the research team, our outputs, publications and partners can be found on this site.

 

BLOGS:

Why Humanosphere’s hibernation matters – and what we can do about it (also published by Humanosphere here)

Does the Daily Mail’s criticism of aid matter? (also published in the Guardian here)

What makes news humanitarian? (Spanish version with El Pais here)

Is humanitarian journalism in crisis?

How does donor funding influence humanitarian journalism?

How do we decide which humanitarian crises are under-reported?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Header image: Photojournalist Knowles-Coursin aboard a UN cargo helicopter headed to Jonglei State, South Sudan, in late 2013.

Solid advice for over thinkers (i.e., 94% of all academics).

Interesting paper by Efrat Nechushtai of @columbiajourn on whether news media are subject to infrastructural capture https://t.co/MTjKgAJwoa

Want to lead Reuters coverage in Nigeria? Apply here. Got to be one of the best journalism gigs in Africa. https://t.co/FST3UB6OuZ

Incredible (& horrifying) immersive reporting from the frontline in #Charlottesville @vicenews @vice @elspethreeve https://t.co/7VvMZ2Tdl1

Wd anyone else like the ghost of Mo Mowlam to show up around now? Just take your wig off and scratch your head a bit Mo...

This is just…astonishing. What a trainwreck. https://t.co/t3ZsCrifDl