About


The world is currently facing the largest humanitarian crisis since the end of the Second World War, with more than 20 million people in four countries facing starvation and famine. At the same time, our ability to learn about such distant crises is severely limited by the failure of the journalism business model. News organisations around the world are struggling to survive and often unable to provide in-depth public interest reporting.

This research project analyses humanitarian journalism at this important juncture. It draws on more than 100 interviews with humanitarian journalists, newsroom observations, extensive analysis of news content, and surveys of audiences. Using this data, we aim to paint a picture of the daily lives of humanitarian journalists and the political, economic and cultural forces that shape their work.

Please get in touch if you have any questions.

Dr Martin Scott
Martin.Scott@uea.ac.uk
@martinscott2010

Dr Melanie Bunce
melanie.bunce.1@city.ac.uk
@meljbunce

Dr Kate Wright
Kate.Wright@ed.ac.uk
@newsprof1

Popular Articles

Twitter

This is potentially very good news for #mediadev efforts. @OpenSociety has been one of the most important donors for decades. https://t.co/Nbw5VxRnnv

Surrealistic scene yesterday at World Bank meetings as Ivanka reinvents herself as a development economist https://t.co/RW8S8JTktT

Being middle class defined by land acquisition in Dar es Salaam says @clairecmercer @africanstudies