About


The world is currently facing the largest humanitarian crisis since the end of the Second World War, with more than 20 million people facing starvation and famine. At the same time, our ability to learn about such crises is severely limited by the failure of the journalism business model. News organisations around the world are struggling to survive and often unable to provide in-depth public interest reporting.

This research project analyses humanitarian journalism at this important juncture. It draws on more than 150 interviews with humanitarian journalists, newsroom observations, extensive analysis of news content, and surveys of audiences. Using this data, we aim to paint a picture of the daily lives of humanitarian journalists and the political, economic and cultural forces that shape their work.

You can find further information about this project -including our latest research publications and blogs – on this site. Please get in touch if you have any questions.

Dr Martin Scott
Martin.Scott@uea.ac.uk
@martinscott2010

Dr Melanie Bunce
melanie.bunce.1@city.ac.uk
@meljbunce

Dr Kate Wright
Kate.Wright@ed.ac.uk
@newsprof1

This research has been approved by the ethics committee at City University.

 

 

PARTNERS

 

 

 

IMAGE CREDITS

 



Twitter

Facing profound loss from years of conflict in the #CentralAfricanRepublic, women find strength and healing in solidarity. Full story: https://t.co/R3ofIj4wZx via @Refugees (📷: UNHCR/Adrienne Surprenant)

How do audiences experience bias when they consume news? They’re ‘Mad, frustrated and detached’. Great to have @journoscholar & @SethCLewis here @cityjournalism to discuss initial findings + method challenges of new project (incl how to access conservative subjects) 3

So happy our article is finally out in Intl Journal of Communication @USCApress "When Disinformation Studies Meets Production Studies", exploring how political troll work is circumscribed within creative industry practices. This benefited greatly from the review process [1/5]