About


The world is currently facing the largest humanitarian crisis since the end of the Second World War, with more than 20 million people facing starvation and famine. At the same time, our ability to learn about such crises is severely limited by the failure of the journalism business model. News organisations around the world are struggling to survive and often unable to provide in-depth public interest reporting.

This research project analyses humanitarian journalism at this important juncture. It draws on more than 150 interviews with humanitarian journalists, newsroom observations, extensive analysis of news content, and surveys of audiences. Using this data, we aim to paint a picture of the daily lives of humanitarian journalists and the political, economic and cultural forces that shape their work.

You can find further information about this project -including our latest research publications and blogs – on this site. Please get in touch if you have any questions.

Dr Martin Scott
Martin.Scott@uea.ac.uk
@martinscott2010

Dr Melanie Bunce
melanie.bunce.1@city.ac.uk
@meljbunce

Dr Kate Wright
Kate.Wright@ed.ac.uk
@newsprof1

This research has been approved by the ethics committee at City University.

 

 

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Twitter

What is an under-reported story of global significance around which I should do a podcast episode.

Send me your suggestions!

City is inviting students actively engaged in British Muslim communities to apply for two MA journalism scholarships with paid placements at @DailyMirror and @TheSun. The scholarships are provided by the Randeree Charitable Trust and @COSARAF.

Full story: https://t.co/PyUczjSDL7

Tweeting in support for @allofmilov
Media producers and male colleagues, just STOP doing this sort of stuff, ok? Its not 'unfortunate' or 'dropping the ball', its intellectual theft which benefits *you* at the expense of a woman. Shame on you @NPR
https://t.co/7BegLGb80s